Lie vs Lay

Lie vs Lay Coming soon

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Principal vs Principle

Principal vs Principle Coming soon

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Common mistakes in English

Page Contents Common errors in English usageAccept/ExceptAdvice/AdviseA lot/AlotAllusion/IllusionCommon errors of English usageThe most common mistakes in English Common errors in English usage Accept/Except Accept means to receive.Except means not including.I accept (receive) all your advice, except (not including) the one about not singing in the shower. Advice/Advise Advice is a noun and means “recommendations about

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What is a euphemism?

Wikipedia's euphemism definition is: an innocent-sounding word or phrase used in place of others which may be offensive or suggest something unpleasant.

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Lets vs Let’s

'Let' is a verb and a noun. It has two meanings as a verb, only one as a noun. All three meanings can end in the letter 's': lets. Also, one of the verbs takes a possessive: "Let's". Find out more about Let vs Let's.

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The Owl and Pussycat Poem

    This poem by Edward Lear goes by several other titles too:~ The Owl and the Pussycat Poem~ Owl and the Pussycat Poem~ The Owl and the Pussy-cat       Verse IThe Owl and the Pussy-cat went to seaIn a beautiful pea-green boat,They took some honey, and plenty of money,Wrapped up in a

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What Is An Oxymoron?

What is an oxymoron? An oxymoron is an expression in which two or more words contradict each other, yet have a meaning that is understood by most people. Many oxymorons aren’t obvious until you really think about them (which in part is what makes them so much fun). Now a moron, on the other hand,

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Crazy Commas—Part 1: Let’s Have Some Fun

Commas are the ninja warrior rebels of punctuation. They sneak up on you and when you least expect it, wreak havoc on your composition. But now, you need no longer fear them.

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Idioms which use nation names

Which idioms use the name of a nation? Don't take French leave (to go, but telling no one first). Read this to find out more.

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Mad about plurals—a gaggle of geese.

What is the plural of goose? Did you say, gooses? Aw, sorry, but no. So, read on...

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Names of Thrones—of Kings and Queens

Henry VIII, Elizabeth I, Edward VII; why are the names Henry, Elizabeth, Edward followed by those weird symbols? What are those symbols and why do we use them? Well, those are regnal names, the official names of kings, queens—and popes.

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Pronunciation: a masterclass for you.

Dearest creature in creation, Study English pronunciation. I will teach you in my verse

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It’s, Its and Its’ – Fun with Apostrophes

We use apostrophes for many reasons; because we're being lazy, because we're being deliberately informal, because we're highlighting a bit of text, or because we're indicating ownership...

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An owl

Peas to show the pea-green colour

Wrapped gifts

Wrapping paper

A five pound note

A guitar

A pig

A shilling; front and back

One pound

Map of Turkey

A turkey

Map of Turkey

Quince

A runcible spoon